Chapter 24

What happened when the pilot-boat came in sight of Shanghai will be easily guessed. The signals made by the `Tankadere' had been seen by the captain off Yokohama steamer, who, espying the flag at half-mast, had directed his course towards the little craft. Phileas Fogg, after paying the stipulated price of his passage to John Bunsby, and rewarding that worthy with the additional sum of five hundred and fifty pounds, ascended the steamer with Aouda and Fix; and they started at once for Nagasaki and Yokohama.

They reached their destination on the morning of the 14th November. Phileas Fogg lost no time in going on board the `Carnatic', where he learned, to Aouda's great delight - and perhaps to his own, though he betrayed no emotion - that Passepartout, a Frenchman, had really arrived on her the day before.

The San Francisco steamer was announced to leave that very evening, and it became necessary to find Passepartout, if possible, without delay. Mr Fogg applied in vain to the French and English consuls, and, after wandering through the streets a long time, began to despair of finding his missing servant. Chance, or ber, that Passepartout made a joyful discovery. It will be remembered that the obstinate fellow had insisted on keeping his famous family watch at London time, and on regarding that of the countries he had passed through as quite false and unreliable. Now, on this day, though he had not changed the hands, he found that his watch exactly agreed with the ship's chronometers. His triumph was hilarious. He would have liked to know what Fix would say if he were aboard!

`The rogue told me a lot of stories,' repeated Passepartout, `about the meridians, the sun, and the moon! Moon, indeed! Moonshine, more likely! If one listened to that sort of people, a pretty sort of time one would keep! I was sure that the sun would some day regulate itself by my watch!'

Passepartout was ignorant that, if the face of his watch had been divided into twenty-four hours, like the Italian clocks, he would have no reason for exultation; for the hao)áμàut a word; and then furnished his man with funds necessary to obtain clothing more in harmony with his position. Within an hour the Frenchman had cut off his nose and parted with his wings, and retained nothing about him which recalled the sectary of the god Tingou.

The steamer which was about to depart from Yokohama to San Francisco belonged to the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, and was named the `General Grant'. She was a large paddle-wheel steamer of two thousand five hundred tons, well equipped and very fast. The massive walking-beam rose and fell above the deck; at one end a piston-rod worked up and down; and at the other was a connecting-rod which, in changing the rectilinear motion to a circular one, was directly connected with the shaft of the paddles. The `General Grant' was rigged with three masts, giving a large capacity for sails, and thus materially aiding the steam power. By making twelve miles an hour, she would cross the ocean in twenty-one days. Phileas Fogg was therefore justified in hoping that he would reach San Francisco by the 2nd December, New York by the 11th, and London on the 20th, - thus gaining several hours on the fatal date of the 21st December.

There was a full complement of passengers on board, among them English, many Americans, a large number of Coolies on their way to California, and several East Indian officers, who were spending their vacation making a tour of the world. Nothing of moment happened on the voyage; the steamer, sustained on its large paddles, rolled but little, and the `Pacific' almost justified its name. Mr Fogg was as calm and taciturn as ever. His young companion felt herself more and more attached to him by other ties than gratitude; his silent but generous nature impressed her more than she thought; and it was almost unconsciously that she yielded to emotions which did not seem to have the least effect upon her protector. Aouda took the keenest interest in his plans, and became impatient at any incident which seemed likely to retard his journey.

She often chatted with Passepartout, who did not fail to perceive the state of the lady's heart; and, being the most faithful of domestics, he never exhausted his eulogies of Phileas Fogg's honesty, generosity and devotion. He took pains to calm Aouda's doubts of a successful termination of the journey, telling her that the most difficult part of it had passed, that now they were beyond the fantastic countries of Japan and China, and were fairly on their way to cited places again. A railway train from San Francisco to New York, and a transatlantic steamer from New York to Liverpool, would doubtless bring them to the end of this impossible journey round the world within the period agreed upon.

On the ninth day after leaving Yokohama, Phileas Fogg had traversed exactly one half of the terrestrial globe. The `General Grant' passed, on the 23rd November, the one hundred and eightieth meridian, and was at the very antipodes of London. Mr Fogg had, it is true, exhausted fifty-two of the eighty days in which he was to complete the tour, and there were only twenty-eight left. But, though he was only half-way by the difference of meridians, he had really gone over two-thirds of the whole journey; for he had been obliged to make long circuits from London to Aden, from Aden to Bombay, from Calcutta to Singapore, and from Singapore to Yokohama. Could he have followed without deviation the fiftieth parallel, which is that of London, the whole distance would only have been about twelve thousand miles; whereas he would be forced, by the irregular methods of locomotion, to traverse twenty-six thousand, of which he had, on the 23rd of November, accomplished seventeen thousand five hundred. And now the course was a straight one, and Fix was no longer there to put obstacles in their way!

It happened also, on the 23rd of November, that Passepartout made a joyful discovery. It will be remembered that the obstinate fellow had insisted on keeping his famous family watch at London time, and on regarding that of the countries he had passed through as quite false and unreliable. Now, on this day, though he had not changed the hands, he found that his watch exactly agreed with the ship's chronometers. His triumph was hilarious. He would have liked to know what Fix would say if he were aboard!

`The rogue told me a lot of stories,' repeated Passepartout, `about the meridians, the sun, and the moon! Moon, indeed! Moonshine, more likely! If one listened to that sort of people, a pretty sort of time one would keep! I was sure that the sun would some day regulate itself by my watch!'

Passepartout was ignorant that, if the face of his watch had been divided into twenty-four hours, like the Italian clocks, he would have no reason for exultation; for the hands of his watch would then, instead of as now indicating nine o'clock in the morning, indicate nine o'clock in the evening, that is the twenty-first hour after midnight, precisely the difference between London time and that of the one hundred and eightieth meridian. But if Fix had been able to explain this purely physical effect, Passepartout would not have admitted, even if he had comprehended it. Moreover, if the detective had been on board at that moment, Passepartout would have joined issue with him on a quite different subject, and in an entirely different manner.

Where was Fix at that moment?

He was actually on board the `General Grant'.

On reaching Yokohama, the detective, leaving Mr Fogg, whom he expected to meet again during the day, had repaired at once to the English consulate, where he at last found the warrant of arrest. It had followed him from Bombay, and had come by the `Carnatic', on which steamer he himself was sub posed to be. Fix's disappointment may be imagined when he reflected that the warrant was now useless.

Mr Fogg had left English ground, and it was now necessary to procure his extradition!

`Well,' thought Fix, after a moment of anger, `my warrant is not good here, but it will be in England. The rogue evidently intends to return to his own country, thinking he has thrown the police off his track. Good! I will follow him across the Atlantic. As for the money, Heaven grant there may be some left! But the fellow has already spent in travelling, rewards, trials, bail, elephants, and all sorts of charges, more than five thousand pounds. Yet, after all, the Bank is rich!'

His course decided on, he went on board the `General Grant', and was there when Mr Fogg and Aouda arrived. To his utter amazement, he recognized Passepartout, despite his theatrical disguise. He quicKly concealed himself in his cabin, to avoid an awkward explanation, and hoped - thanks to the number of passengers - to remain unperceived by Mr Fogg's servant.

On that very day, however, he met Passepartout face to face on the forward deck. The latter, without a word, made a rush for him, grasped him by the throat, and, much to the amusement of a group of Americans, who immediately began to bet on him, administered to the detective a perfect volley of blows, which proved the great superiority of French over English pugilistic skill.

When Passepartout had finished, he found himself relieved and comforted. Fix got up in a somewhat rumpled condition, and, looking at his adversary, coldly said, `Have you done?'

`For this time - yes.'

`Then let me have a word with you.'

`But!--'

`In your master's interest.'

Passepartout seemed to be vanquished by Fix's coolness, for he quietly followed him, and they sat down aside from the rest of the passengers.

`You have given me a thrashing,' said Fix. `Good, I expected it. Now, listen to me. Up to this time I have been Mr Fogg's adversary. I am now in his game.'

`Aha!' cried Passepartout; `you are convinced he is an honest man?'

`No,' replied Fix coldly, `I think him a rascal. Sh! don't budge, and let me speak. As long as Mr Fogg was on English ground, it was for my interest to detain him there until my warrant of arrest arrived. I did everything I could to keep him back. I sent the Bombay priests after him, I got you intoxicated at Hong Kong, I separated you from him, and I made him miss the Yokohama steamer.'

Passepartout listened, with closed fists.

`Now,' resumed Fix, `Mr Fogg seems to be going back to England. Well, I will follow him there. But hereafter I will do as much to keep obstacles out of his way as I have done up to this time to put them in his path. I've changed my game, you see, and simply because it was for my interest to change it. Your interest is the same as mine; for it is only in England that you will ascertain whether you are in the service of a criminal or an honest man.'

Passepartout listened very attentively to Fix, and was convinced that he spoke with entire good faith.

`Are we friends?' asked the detective.

`Friends? - no,' replied Passepartout; `but allies, perhaps. At the least sign of treason, however, I'll twist your neck for you.'

`Agreed,' said the detective quietly.

Eleven days later, on the 3rd of December, the `General Grant' entered the bay of the Golden Gate, and reached San Francisco.

Mr Fogg had neither gained nor lost a single day.

关于在上海发生的事情,我们已经知道了。唐卡德尔号当时发出的信号已经被开往横滨的邮船发现。船长看见小船上下半旗,就命令邮船向唐卡德尔号开去。过了不久,斐利亚·福克先生算清了船费,把为数五百英镑(合一万二千五百法郎)的钞票交给了约翰·班斯比船长。然后这个尊贵的绅士和艾娥达夫人,还有费克斯就一齐上了这条立即开往长崎和横滨的邮船。

就在11月14日当天早晨,邮船准时地到达了横滨。辐克先生让费克斯去忙他自己的事了,然后福克先生就去找卡尔纳蒂克号。他在那里知道路路通确是在昨天晚上到了横滨,这个消息使艾娥达夫人高兴极了。福克先生也许会同样感到高兴,不过他在脸上却一点也没有表现出来。

斐利亚·福克先生当天晚上就要搭船去旧金山,所以他立即去找路路通。他问过法国和英国领事馆,但是一点消息也没有。他跑遍了横滨的大街,仍然一无所获,于是他对于把路路通再找回来这件事已经不抱什么希望了。但就是在这时,可能是由于碰巧,或者由于某一种预感,他竟走进了巴图尔卡先生的马戏棚。当时路路通穿着那样奇怪的古装,福克先生当然不会认出他来,可是在台上仰卧着的路路通却看到了他的主人坐在花楼上的包厢里。这时,小伙子再也不能使自己的鼻子一动也不动地保持在原来的地位了,因此就使整个“罗汉塔”失去了平衡,倒塌了。

接着,路路通也从艾娥达夫人那里知道了过去几天的事。艾娥达夫人告诉他如何从香港到了横滨,如何同一位名叫费克斯的先生一起乘坐唐卡德尔号等等。

听到费克斯的名字,路路通并没皱眉头。他觉得现在对福克先生说明费克斯和自己之间的纠葛,还不是时候。至于路路通对于自己的经历,他只承认是在横滨的一个烟馆里吸大烟吸醉了。

福克先生冷静地听完了他的叙述,没有说一句话,然后就给了他一笔足够的钱使他能在船上买到更合适的衣服。不到一个钟头,这个正直的小伙子已经去掉了假鼻子,摘下了花翅膀,在他身上再也找不到一点“天狗神派”的装饰了。

这条由横滨开往旧金山的邮船是太平洋轮船公司的船,船名叫格兰特将军号,这是一条两千五百吨的大轮船,设备很好,速度很快。甲板上露出一根很长的蒸汽机杠杆,两头一高一低地不停活动,这根杠杆的一端联接着活塞柄,另一头联着轮机上的曲轴,这样就把杠杆的直线推动力转变为直接推动轮机的动力,从而使轮轴不停地旋转起来。格兰特将军号装有三个大帆。帆面很宽,有力地协助发动机加快航行速度。按这样每小时十二海里的速度计算,这条邮船用不了二十一天就能横渡太平洋。因此,斐利亚·福克先生相信12月2号将能到达旧金山,11号就能到纽约,12月20号就可以回到伦敦。这样一来,他还能在原定的那个决定命运的时间——12月21日——之前几小时完成这次旅行的任务。

船上旅客相当多,有一些英国人,但更多的是美国人;还有许多到美洲去的苦力移民;也有一部分是在印度军队中服役的军官,他们在利用假期作世界旅行。

这一次,旅途中没有发生任何航海事故。格兰特将军号依靠巨大的轮机,借助于全面展开的大帆,四平八稳地顺利前进。太平洋确实可以说名副其实的“太平”。福克先生沉默寡言,依然如故。现在他那位年轻的旅伴艾娥达夫人,对他已经日益感到亲切,而这种亲切已经不止是感激之情了。他那样和蔼可亲的沉静的性格,在艾娥达夫人心中产生了一种连她自己都想象不到的影响,甚至可以说,艾娥达夫人已经不知不觉地堕入了一种微妙的幻想,而这位令人难以捉摸的福克先生对于艾娥达夫人这种心情却象是一无所知。

此外,艾娥达夫人现在对于福克先生的旅行计划也显得非常关心。她总是担心着怕有什么意外事故会妨碍他们完成这个旅行计划。她经常和路路通闲谈,这个小伙子,从艾娥达夫人谈话的语气里已经猜透了对方的心事。他现在对于自己的主人简直象迷信人敬神一样地盲目崇拜,他滔滔不绝地夸赞福克先生如何诚实,如何宽厚,对人如何热心;然后他又安慰艾娥达夫人,说这次旅行一定会成功。他一次又一次他说,最困难的阶段已经过去了;我们已经离开了中国和日本的那些神奇莫测的地方,我们已经回到了这些文明的国度,最后只要坐上火车,从旧金山到纽约,再坐上横渡大洋的轮船,从纽约到伦敦,这样就毫无疑问能够按时完成这个人们认为不可能的环球旅行了。

离开横滨九天之后,斐利亚·福克先生不多不少地正好绕了半个地球。

格兰特将军号正是11月23日越过一百八十度子午线,位于南半球的这条子午线,正好和北半球的伦敦隔着地球成一条垂直线。不错,福克先生所预定的八十天期限现在已经用去了五十二天,他只剩下二十八天的时间了。但是,我们必须注意,如果说这位绅士按照地球经度子午线计算他才走完了一半路程,那么事实上他已经完成了三分之二以上的旅行计划。因为,他不得不绕这么大一个圈子,从伦敦到亚丁,从亚丁到孟买,从加尔各答到新加坡,再从新加坡到横滨!要是他顺着伦敦所在的纬度五十度线直线环绕地球的话,全程只不过一万二千英里上下;但是由于交通条件的限制,他必须绕道两万六千英里才能回到伦敦。目前,到11月23号这一天,他已经走完了大约一万七千五百英里,不过从此地到伦敦却都是直路了,而且眼前那个专门制造困难的费克斯也不在了。

11月23号这一天,路路通也发现了一件使他非常高兴的事。我们总还记得这个顽固的小伙子曾一直让他那个传家之宝的大银表,一成不变地保持着伦敦时间。他在沿途各地都一直认为别人的钟表所指示的时间是错误的。可是今天,虽然他从没有拔快或者倒拔自己的表针,但是却发现它和船上的大钟走得完全一样。

路路通之所以感到一种胜利的喜悦,还有另外一个原因,那就是假如费克斯也在这里的话,他很想听听这家伙对他的表会说些什么。

“这个混球儿,他给我罗嗦了一大堆什么子午线啦,什么太阳、月亮啦!”路路通说,“嘿!这种人,你要听了他们的话,就别想再有一个准钟点了。我早就知道,总有一天,太阳会照着我的表走的!……”

但是路路通并不了解,如果他的表面象那种意大利钟一样分做二十四个小时的话,他就一点也不可能象现在这样洋洋得意了。若是那样,当船上的大钟指着早晨九点的时候,路路通表上的时针就会指着晚上九点,也就是二十四小时中的第二十一点,那么他的表和船上的大钟相差的时数就正好等于子午线一百八十度地区的时间和伦敦时间相差的时数。

即使费克斯能够把这个道理讲清楚,路路通大概也不会理解,即使他理解了,他也不会承认费克斯是对的。可是,假定说——当然这是不会有的事——这个侦探现在真的突然出现在这条船上的话,这个对他恨之入骨而又理直气壮的路路通,准会用另外一种态度对待他,决不会跟他谈大银表的问题。

可是,费克斯现在到底跑到哪儿去了呢?……

费克斯不在别处,正是在格兰特将军号上。

实际上,这位密探一到了横滨就离开了福克先生,马上去找英国领事馆,不过他打算当天还能找着福克先生。他在领事馆终于拿到了那张从孟买开始一直跟在他后面转寄了四十天的拘票。因为有关当局以为费克斯一定会乘卡尔纳蒂克号,所以就把这张拘票也交这条船由香港寄来横滨。可以想见,这件事使我们这位侦探多么伤脑筋!拘票在这儿没用了,成了一张废纸!福克先生已经离开了英国的势力范围!现在要想逮捕他,就必须跟当地政府办理引渡手续!

“算了!”费克斯在一阵怒气平息了之后对自己说,“我的拘票在这儿是吃不开了。不过一到了英国本土,它还是照样管事儿。福克这流氓,看样子还真的是要回到英国去,他以为警察厅已经被他蒙过了。好吧!我就一直盯到底。至于说赃款,天知道还能剩下多少!旅费、奖金、诉讼费、保释金、买大象以及其他一路上的种种支出,他已经挥霍了五千多英镑了。不过,不管怎样,银行的钱反正多着呢!”

他拿定了主意之后,立即登上了格兰特将军号。当福克先生和艾娥达夫人上船的时候,费克斯已经在船上了。这时他万想不到竟会看见了穿着一身日本古装的路路通,他马上躲进了自己的房舱,免得引起争辩,把事情弄糟了。有一天由于旅客很多,费克斯认为自己绝不会被对手发现,他就出来了,可是冤家路窄,就在这个时候,他在前甲板上碰上了路路通。

这个法国小伙子二话不说,上去就掐住了费克斯的脖子,这下子旁边围着看的一些美国佬可高兴了,他们立刻分成了两派,就拿路路通和费克斯的胜败赌起钱来了。小伙子左一拳,右一拳,把这个倒霉的密探结结实实地揍了一顿,从这可以看出,法国拳击术比英国把式高明得多。

路路通把费克斯揍了一顿之后,心里象是得到了一点安慰,火气也比较小了。这时费克斯的仪表已经很不象话了,他爬起来望着路路通,冷冷地说:“打够了?”

“嗯,暂时打够了。”

“那好吧,走,咱们去谈谈。”

“我还跟你……”

“对你主人有好处的事。”

路路通好象是被这个沉静的敌手降服了似的,就跟着他一起到船头甲板上坐下了。

“你揍了我一顿,”费克斯说,“这没什么,我早就等着你揍我呢。不过,现在你听我说,我过去一向是和福克先生作对,但是从今以后,我要帮助他了。”

“啊!”路路通叫着说,“你现在也相信他是正人君子了?”

“不相信,”费克斯冷冰冰他说,“我相信他是个流氓。嘿!你别动手,听我说完行不行!当福克先生在英国势力范围的时候,拖住福克,对我有好处,因为我要等伦敦寄给我拘票。为了这个目的,我用尽了一切办法,我曾唆使孟买的僧侣赶到加尔各答起诉告他,我曾经在香港把你弄醉使你们分开,叫他搭不上去横滨的船……”

路路通听着,两只大拳头握得紧紧的。

“可是现在,”费克斯接着说,“福克先生象是要回英国去了,是吗?那很好,我一直跟他到英国。不过,从现在起,我要帮助他扫除旅途上的阻碍,我一定拿过去尽力设法阻碍他旅行的那种迫切心情和积极性来帮助他回到英国。你现在明自了吧,我要起的作用变了,我的作用所以改变,那是因为这样作,对我自己的工作有利。我再重复一句,现在你的利益也就是我的利益,因为只有到了英国,你才会明白你到底是替一个好人当差,还是在给一个罪犯当狗腿子。”

路路通非常仔细听完了费克斯这一段话。他确信费克斯说的都是心里的话。

“我们可以说是朋友了吧?”费克斯问。

“朋友?我们不是,”路路通回答说,“我们只能算是同盟者,对了,只是在保证福克先生利益的条件下和你是同盟者,那就是说,只要我发现你再耍一点花招,我就掐死你!”

“我同意,”费克斯不动声色他说。

过了十一天之后,正是12月3号,格兰特将军号开进金门港,到达了旧金山。

到现在为止,福克先生只是如期到达了旧金山,一天也没有推迟,但也没有提前到达。

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