Chapter 3 First Attempts

When Georges Duroy reached the street, he hesitated as to what he should do. He felt inclined to stroll along, dreaming of the future and inhaling the soft night air; but the thought of the series of articles ordered by M. Walter occurred to him, and he decided to return home at once and begin work. He walked rapidly along until he came to Rue Boursault. The tenement in which he lived was occupied by twenty families — families of workingmen — and as he mounted the staircase he experienced a sensation of disgust and a desire to live as wealthy men do. Duroy’s room was on the fifth floor. He entered it, opened his window, and looked out: the view was anything but prepossessing.

He turned away, thinking: “This won’t do. I must go to work.” So he placed his light upon the table and began to write. He dipped his pen into the ink and wrote at the head of his paper in a bold hand: “Souvenirs of a Soldier in Africa.” Then he cast about for the first phrase. He rested his head upon his hand and stared at the blank sheet before him. What should he say? Suddenly he thought: “I must begin with my departure,” and he wrote: “In 1874, about the fifteenth of May, when exhausted France was recruiting after the catastrophe of the terrible years —” Here he stopped short, not knowing how to introduce his subject. After a few minutes’ reflection, he decided to lay aside that page until the following day, and to write a description of Algiers. He began: “Algiers is a very clean city —” but he could not continue. After an effort he added: “It is inhabited partly by Arabs.” Then he threw his pen upon the table and arose. He glanced around his miserable room; mentally he rebelled against his poverty and resolved to leave the next day.

Suddenly the desire to work came on him, and he tried to begin the article again; he had vague ideas of what he wanted to say, but he could not express his thoughts in words. Convinced of his inability he arose once more, his blood coursing rapidly through his veins. He turned to the window just as the train was coming out of the tunnel, and his thoughts reverted to his parents. He saw their tiny home on the heights overlooking Rouen and the valley of the Seine. His father and mother kept an inn, La Belle-Vue, at which the citizens of the faubourgs took their lunches on Sundays. They had wished to make a “gentleman” of their son and had sent him to college. His studies completed, he had entered the army with the intention of becoming an officer, a colonel, or a general. But becoming disgusted with military life, he determined to try his fortune in Paris. When his time of service had expired, he went thither, with what results we have seen. He awoke from his reflections as the locomotive whistled shrilly, closed his window, and began to disrobe, muttering: “Bah, I shall be able to work better to-morrow morning. My brain is not clear to-night. I have drunk a little too much. I can’t work well under such circumstances.” He extinguished his light and fell asleep.

He awoke early, and, rising, opened his window to inhale the fresh air. In a few moments he seated himself at his table, dipped his pen in the ink, rested his head upon his hand and thought — but in vain! However, he was not discouraged, but in thought reassured himself: “Bah, I am not accustomed to it! It is a profession that must be learned like all professions. Some one must help me the first time. I’ll go to Forestier. He’ll start my article for me in ten minutes.”

When he reached the street, Duroy decided that it was rather early to present himself at his friend’s house, so he strolled along under the trees on one of the boulevards for a time. On arriving at Forestier’s door, he found his friend going out.

“You here — at this hour! Can I do anything for you?”

Duroy stammered in confusion: “I— I— cannot write that article on Algeria that M. Walter wants. It is not very surprising, seeing that I have never written anything. It requires practice. I could write very rapidly, I am sure, if I could make a beginning. I have the ideas but I cannot express them.” He paused and hesitated.

Forestier smiled maliciously: “I understand that.”

Duroy continued: “Yes, anyone is liable to have that trouble at the beginning; and, well — I have come to ask you to help me. In ten minutes you can set me right. You can give me a lesson in style; without you I can do nothing.”

The other smiled gaily. He patted his companion’s arm and said to him: “Go to my wife; she will help you better than I can. I have trained her for that work. I have not time this morning or I would do it willingly.”

But Duroy hesitated: “At this hour I cannot inquire for her.”

“Oh, yes, you can; she has risen. You will find her in my study.”

“I will go, but I shall tell her you sent me!”

Forestier walked away, and Duroy slowly ascended the stairs, wondering what he should say and what kind of a reception he would receive.

The servant who opened the door said: “Monsieur has gone out.”

Duroy replied: “Ask Mme. Forestier if she will see me, and tell her that M. Forestier, whom I met on the street, sent me.”

The lackey soon returned and ushered Duroy into Madame’s presence. She was seated at a table and extended her hand to him.

“So soon?” said she. It was not a reproach, but a simple question.

He stammered: “I did not want to come up, Madame, but your husband, whom I met below, insisted — I dare scarcely tell you my errand — I worked late last night and early this morning, to write the article on Algeria which M. Walter wants — and I did not succeed — I destroyed all my attempts — I am not accustomed to the work — and I came to ask Forestier to assist me — his once.”

She interrupted with a laugh: “And he sent you to me?”

“Yes, Madame. He said you could help me better than he — but — I dared not — I did not like to.”

She rose.

“It will be delightful to work together that way. I am charmed with your idea. Wait, take my chair, for they know my handwriting on the paper — we will write a successful article.”

She took a cigarette from the mantelpiece and lighted it. “I cannot work without smoking,” she said; “what are you going to say?”

He looked at her in astonishment. “I do not know; I came here to find that out.”

She replied: “I will manage it all right. I will make the sauce but I must have the dish.” She questioned him in detail and finally said:

“Now, we will begin. First of all we will suppose that you are addressing a friend, which will allow us scope for remarks of all kinds. Begin this way: ‘My dear Henry, you wish to know something about Algeria; you shall.’”

Then followed a brilliantly worded description of Algeria and of the port of Algiers, an excursion to the province of Oran, a visit to Saida, and an adventure with a pretty Spanish maid employed in a factory.

When the article was concluded, he could find no words of thanks; he was happy to be near her, grateful for and delighted with their growing intimacy. It seemed to him that everything about him was a part of her, even to the books upon the shelves. The chairs, the furniture, the air — all were permeated with that delightful fragrance peculiar to her.

She asked bluntly: “What do you think of my friend Mme. de Marelle?”

“I think her very fascinating,” he said; and he would have liked to add: “But not as much so as you.” He had not the courage to do so.

She continued: “If you only knew how comical, original, and intelligent she is! She is a true Bohemian. It is for that reason that her husband no longer loves her. He only sees her defects and none of her good qualities.”

Duroy was surprised to hear that Mme. de Marelle was married.

“What,” he asked, “is she married? What does her husband do?”

Mme. Forestier shrugged her shoulders. “Oh, he is superintendent of a railroad. He is in Paris a week out of each month. His wife calls it ‘Holy Week.’ or ‘The week of duty.’ When you get better acquainted with her, you will see how witty she is! Come here and see her some day.”

As she spoke, the door opened noiselessly, and a gentleman entered unannounced. He halted on seeing a man. For a moment Mme. Forestier seemed confused; then she said in a natural voice, though her cheeks were tinged with a blush:

“Come in, my dear sir; allow me to present to you an old comrade of Charles, M. Georges Duroy, a future journalist.” Then in a different tone, she said: “Our best and dearest friend, Count de Vaudrec.”

The two men bowed, gazed into one another’s eyes, and then Duroy took his leave. Neither tried to detain him.

On reaching the street he felt sad and uncomfortable. Count de Vaudrec’s face was constantly before him. It seemed to him that the man was displeased at finding him tete-a-tete with Mme. Forestier, though why he should be, he could not divine.

To while away the time until three o’clock, he lunched at Duval’s, and then lounged along the boulevard. When the clock chimed the hour of his appointment, he climbed the stairs leading to the office of “La Vie Francaise.”

Duroy asked: “Is M. Walter in?”

“M. Walter is engaged,” was the reply. “Will you please take a seat?”

Duroy waited twenty minutes, then he turned to the clerk and said: “M. Walter had an appointment with me at three o’clock. At any rate, see if my friend M. Forestier is here.”

He was conducted along a corridor and ushered into a large room in which four men were writing at a table. Forestier was standing before the fireplace, smoking a cigarette. After listening to Duroy’s story he said:

“Come with me; I will take you to M. Walter, or else you might remain here until seven o’clock.”

They entered the manager’s room. Norbert de Varenne was writing an article, seated in an easychair; Jacques Rival, stretched upon a divan, was smoking a cigar. The room had the peculiar odor familiar to all journalists. When they approached M. Walter, Forestier said: “Here is my friend Duroy.”

The manager looked keenly at the young man and asked:

“Have you brought my article?”

Duroy drew the sheets of manuscript from his pocket.

“Here they are, Monsieur.”

The manager seemed delighted and said with a smile: “Very good. You are a man of your word. Need I look over it, Forestier?”

But Forestier hastened to reply: “It is not necessary, M. Walter; I helped him in order to initiate him into the profession. It is very good.” Then bending toward him, he whispered: “You know you promised to engage Duroy to replace Marambot. Will you allow me to retain him on the same terms?”

“Certainly.”

Taking his friend’s arm, the journalist drew him away, while M. Walter returned to the game of ecarte he had been engaged in when they entered. Forestier and Duroy returned to the room in which Georges had found his friend. The latter said to his new reporter:

“You must come here every day at three o’clock, and I will tell you what places to go to. First of all, I shall give you a letter of introduction to the chief of the police, who will in turn introduce you to one of his employees. You can arrange with him for all important news, official and semiofficial. For details you can apply to Saint-Potin, who is posted; you will see him to-morrow. Above all, you must learn to make your way everywhere in spite of closed doors. You will receive two hundred francs a months, two sous a line for original matter, and two sous a line for articles you are ordered to write on different subjects.”

“What shall I do to-day?” asked Duroy.

“I have no work for you to-day; you can go if you wish to.”

“And our — our article?”

“Oh, do not worry about it; I will correct the proofs. Do the rest to-morrow and come here at three o’clock as you did to-day.”

And after shaking hands, Duroy descended the staircase with a light heart.

  到了街上,乔治·杜洛瓦有点犹豫不定,不知道自己现在该去做点什么。

  他真想撒开两腿,痛痛快快地跑一起,又想找个地方坐下来,任凭自己的想象自由驰骋。他一边漫无目的地往前走着,一边憧憬着美好的未来,呼吸着夏夜清凉的空气。可是,瓦尔特老头要他写文章的事总在他的脑际盘旋不去,他因而决定还是立刻回去,马上就动起笔来。

  他大步往回走着,很快便到了住所附近的环城大道,然后沿着这条大道,一直走到他所住的布尔索街,这是一幢七层楼房,里面住着二十来户人家,全都是工人和普通市民。楼内很黑,他只得以点火用的蜡绳照明。楼梯上,到处是烟头纸屑和厨房内扔出的污物,他不由地感到一阵恶心,真想明天就搬出这个鬼地方,像富人那样,住到窗明几净、铺着地毯的房子里去。不像这里,整个楼房从上到下,终日弥漫着令人窒息的混浊气味,如饭菜味、汗酸味、便池溢出的臭味,以及随处可见的陈年污物和表皮剥落的墙壁发出的积聚不散的霉味,什么样的穿堂风也不能将它吹散。

  杜洛瓦住在六层楼上,窗外便是城西铁路距巴蒂寥尔车站不远的隧道出口。狭长的通道,两边立着高耸的石壁。俯视下方,如临深渊。杜洛瓦打开窗户,支着胳肘靠在窗前,窗上的铁栏杆早已一片锈蚀。

  只见下方黑咕隆咚的通道深处,一动不动地闪烁着三盏红色信号灯,看去酷似伏在那里的野兽眼内发出的寒光。这灯,稍远处又是几盏;再远处还有几盏。长短不定的汽笛声不时划破夜空,有的近在咫尺,有的来自阿尼尔方向,几乎听不太清。这汽笛声同人的喊声一样,也有强弱变化。其中一声由远而近,由弱而强,呜呜咽咽,如泣如诉;不久,随着一声长鸣,黑暗中突然一道耀眼的黄光奔驰而来,但见一长串车厢带着隆隆声消失在隧道深处。

  看到这里。杜洛瓦在心里嘀咕道:

  “得了,该去写我的文章了。”

  他把灯放在桌上,正打算伏案动笔,才发现他这里仅有一叠信笺。

  管他呢,就用这信笺吧。说着,他把信笺摊开,拿起笔,在墨盒里蘸了点墨水,作为标题,在信笺上方工工整整地写了几个秀丽的大字:

  非洲服役散记

  接着开始考虑,这开篇第一句该如何下笔。

  他托着腮,目光盯着面前摊开的方形白色信笺,半晌毫无动静。

  怎么回事?刚才还绘声绘色地讲的那些趣闻和经历,怎么竟全都无影无踪,一点也想不起来了?他忽然眼睛一亮:

  “对,这第一篇应当从我启程那天写起。”

  于是提笔写道:

  那是一八七四年五月十五日前后,刚刚经历了可怕

  岁月的法国,已是百孔千疮,正处于休养生息之际……

  写到这里,他的笔突然停住了,不知道应如何落笔,方可引出随后的经历:港口登船、海上航行及登上非洲大陆的最初激动。

  他考虑了很长时间,依然一无所获,最后只得决定,这第一段开场白还是放到明天再写,此刻不如把阿尔及尔的市容先写出来。

  他在另一张纸上写道:“阿尔及尔是一座洁白的城市……”再往下,又什么也写不出来了。提起阿尔及尔,他的眼前又浮现出了那座明丽而漂亮的城市。一座座低矮的平房,如同飞泻而下的瀑布,由山顶一直伸展到海边。然而无论他怎样搜尽枯肠,也依然想不出一个完整的句子,把当时的感受和所见所闻表达出来。

  这样憋了半天,终于又想出一句:“该城一部分由阿拉伯人占据……”此后又是已经出现过的尴尬局面,依然是什么也写不出。他把笔往桌上一扔,站了起来。

  身边那张小铁床,因他睡得久了,中间已凹下一块。他看到,床上现在扔着一堆他平素穿的衣服,不但皱皱巴巴,而且没有丝毫挺括可言,看那龌龊的样子,简直同停尸房待人认领的破衣烂衫相差无几。在一张垫着麦秸的椅子上,放着他唯一的一顶丝质礼帽,且帽筒朝天,仿佛在等待布施。

  四壁贴着灰底蓝花的糊墙纸,斑斑驳驳,布满污渍。因为年深日久,这些污渍已说不清是怎样造成的。有的可能是按扁了的虫蚁或溅上去的油珠,有的则可能是沾了发蜡的指印或是漱洗时从脸盆里飞溅出的肥皂泡。总之,举目所见,一副破烂景象,使人备觉凄楚。在巴黎,凡带家具出租的房舍,都是这种衰败、破落的样子。看到自己住的地方如此恶劣,杜洛瓦再也沉不住气了。“搬,明天就搬,这种穷愁潦倒的生活再也不能继续下去了,”他在心里发恨道。

  想到这里,他心中突然涌起一股跃跃欲试的劲头,决心非把这篇文章写出来不可。于是又重新在桌边坐了下来,为准确地描述出阿尔及尔这座别具风情的迷人城市,而苦苦地思索着。非洲这块诱人的、迄今尚未开垦的处女地,不仅居住着四海为家的阿拉伯人,而且居住着不为世人所知的黑人。迄今为止,人们对非洲的了解还仅限于在公园里间或可看到的那些珍禽异兽。正是这些带有神秘色彩的珍禽异兽,为人们绘声绘色地创造出的一个个神话故事,提供了取之不尽的素材。比如有野鸡的奇异变种——身躯高大的驼鸟,有超凡脱俗的山羊——动作敏捷如飞的羚羊,此外还有脖颈细长、滑稽可笑的长颈鹿、神态庄重的骆驼、力大无比的河马、步履蹒跚的犀牛,以及人类的近亲——性情凶悍的大猩猩。而阿尔及尔正是进入这神秘、广袤的非洲大陆所必经的门户。

  杜洛瓦隐约感到,自己总算摸到一点思路了。不过这些东西,他若口头表达,恐怕倒还可以,但要写成文章,就难而又难了。他为自己力不从心而焦躁不已,接着重又站了起来,两手汗津津的,太阳穴跳个不停。

  他的目光这时在无意中落到一张洗衣服的帐单上,这是门房当晚送上来的。屋漏偏逢倾盆雨,他蓦然感到一片绝望。转眼之间,满腔的喜悦连同他的自信和对未来的美好憧憬,已消失得无影无踪。这下完了,一切都完了。他成不了什么大事,不会有什么作为。他感到自己是如此的空虚,无能,天生是个废物,不可能有飞黄腾达的日子。

  他又回到窗前,俯身对着窗外。恰在这时,忽然汽笛长鸣,一列火车带着隆隆的声响钻出窗下的隧道,穿过原野,向天际的海边驶去。这使他想起了远在那边的父母。

  父母居住的小屋,离铁路仅有十几公里之遥。他仿佛又看到了这间小屋,它立于康特勒村村口,俯瞰着近在咫尺的卢昂城①和四周一望无际的塞纳河冲积平原。

  --------

  ①卢昂,法国塞纳河下游,距英吉利海峡不远的一座大城市。

  父母在自己居住的农舍开了一家小酒店,取名“风光酒店”。每逢星期天,卢昂城关的一些有钱人常会举家来此就餐。父母一心希望儿子能出人头地,所以让他上了中学。可是学业期满,他的毕业会考却未通过,于是抱着将来或许能当个中校或将军的心理去服兵役。然而五年的服役期刚刚过半,他已对这种单调乏味的军人生活腻烦透了,一心想到巴黎来碰碰运气。

  父母对他的期望早已破灭,曾想把他留在身边。但他不顾父母的恳求,服役期一满,便到了巴黎。同父母当年望子成龙心切一样,他也盼望着自己能果然混个样儿来。他隐约感到,只要抓住有利时机,是定会成功的。只是这机会是什么样子,他还只有一些朦胧的感觉。他相信,到时候,他是定会努力促成,抓住不放的。

  在团队驻守的地方,他曾一帆风顺,运气很是不错,甚至在当地的上流社会中有过几次艳遇。他曾把一税务官的女儿弄到手,姑娘为了能够跟他,曾决心扔掉一切。他还勾引过一个讼师的妻子,这女人被他遗弃后,在失望之际,曾打算投河自尽。

  团队里的同伴在谈到他的时候,都说他“为人精明,诡谲,遇事干练而沉稳,总有办法对付”。是的,他就要让自己成为一个“精明、诡谲、遇事干练”的人。

  在非洲这几年,他虽然天天过的是军营的刻板生活,但间或也干些杀人越货、非法买卖和尔虞我诈的勾当;平时所受教育虽然是流行于军中的荣誉观和爱国精神,但耳闻目睹却是一些人的渴慕虚荣和好大喜功,是下级官兵间流传的一些侠义故事。经过这些年的耳濡目染,他那来自娘胎的诺曼底人天性早已失去其原来的单纯了。他的脑海里如今装着的,是三教九流,无奇不有。

  但其中最主要的,却是不惜一切向上爬的强烈欲望。

  不知不觉中,他又想入非非起来了,这是他每天晚上孤灯独坐时所常有的。他梦想着自己一天在大街上同一位银行家或达官贵人的千金小姐萍水相逢,对方立刻为他的翩翩风度所倾倒,对他一见钟情。不久,二人遂喜结良缘,他也就一蹴而就,从此平步青云,今非昔比了。

  不想一声尖利的汽笛声,把他从这场美梦中惊醒了过来。只见一辆机车像一只突然从窝里窜出的肥大兔子,孤零零地钻出隧道,全速向机库飞驰而去。

  人是醒了,但那个终日梦牵魂萦的甜蜜而又不太真切的期望,却依然停留在心里。他举起手,向窗外的茫茫黑夜投了个飞吻。这飞吻既是对他期待已久的梦中美人所寄予的缠绵情思,也是对他朝思暮想的荣华富贵所给予的祝祷。接着,他关上窗户,开始宽衣上床,口中喃喃地说道:

  “算了,今天晚上思想不太集中,明天早上肯定不会这样。再说,我今晚可能多喝了两杯,在这种情况下哪里能写出好文章?”

  他爬上床,吹灭了灯,几乎是立刻就呼呼睡去了。

  第二天,他醒得很早,如同心里有事或怀抱某种强烈希望的人所常见的。他跳下床,走去打开窗户,深深地吸了一口新鲜空气。

  向前望去,宽阔的铁路通道那边的罗马街,沐浴在灿烂的晨光下,街上的房子好似刷了一层白色的彩釉,分外耀眼。而在右边,远处的阿让特山丘、萨努瓦高地和奥热蒙磨房,则笼罩在一层轻柔的淡蓝色晨雾中,仿佛天际有一块透明的纱巾在随风飘荡。

  杜洛瓦在窗边站了一会儿,默默地遥看远处的田野,口中喃喃地说道:“天气这样好,那边的景色一定非常迷人。”接着,他想到那篇文章尚无着落,必须马上动手。于是拿出十个苏给了门房的儿子,打发他去他办公的地方给他请个病假。

  他在桌边坐了下来,拿起笔,在墨盒里蘸了点墨水,随后又双手托着脑门,冥思苦想起来。但依然是白费劲儿,脑袋里空空的,一个完整的句子也未想出。

  不过他并未气馁,心中嘀咕道:“哎,我对于这一行还不摸门,这也同其他行业一样,需要有一个适应过程。要写好这篇文章,看来得有个人在开始的时候给我指点一下。我这就去找弗雷斯蒂埃,他不消十分钟,便会帮我把文章的架子搭起来。”

  说着,他穿好了衣服。

  到了街上,他又觉得,弗雷斯蒂埃昨晚一定睡得很晚,现在去他家未免太早。他因而沿着附近那条环城大街,在树下慢慢地溜达了起来。

  现在还刚刚九点,他信步走进蒙梭公园。因为刚洒过水,公园里的空气显得特别湿润而清凉。

  他找了条长椅坐下,又开始想入非非起来。一衣着入时的青年男子正在他的前方来回踱着方步,显然是在等候一位女士。

  果不其然,过了片刻,一个戴着面纱的女人急匆匆地走了过来,握了握男青年的手。然后挽着他的胳臂,双双离去了。

  此情此景在杜洛瓦心中突然掀起了一股对于爱的追求的汹涌波涛,但他所需要的,是名门闺秀的爱,是格调高雅、别具柔情的爱。他站起身,继续向弗雷斯蒂埃家走去,心下想着,这家伙倒是福星高照,鸿运亨通!

  不想他走到朋友家门口,正赶上他从里边出来。

  “啊,你来啦。这个时候来找我,有什么事吗?”

  杜洛瓦见他正要出门,未免有点难于启齿,半晌说道:

  “我……我……我想告诉你,瓦尔特先生要我写的关于阿尔及利亚的文章,我没有写出来。这很好理解,因为我一篇东西也未写过。干哪一行都得有个熟悉过程,写文章也不例外。我相信,我会很快写出好文章来的,但开始阶段,我却有点不摸门儿。文章的意思我已想好,整篇都想好了,就是不知道怎样把它写出来。”

  说到这里,他停了下来,一副欲言又止的样子。弗雷斯蒂埃狡黠地向他笑了笑说:

  “这我知道。”

  杜洛瓦于是接着说道:

  “就是呀,不管做什么,人人在开始的时候都会这样。所以我今天来……是想求你帮个忙……我想费你几分钟时间,请件帮我把文章的架子搭起来。此外,这种文章应采用什么样的格调,遣词造句应当注意什么,也请你给我指点指点。否则,没有你的帮助,这篇文章我是交不了差的。”

  弗雷斯蒂埃始终在那里乐呵呵地笑着。后来,他拍了拍这位老友的臂膀,向他说道:

  “这样吧,你马上去找我妻子,她会帮你把这件事办好的,而且办得不会比我差。她那写文章的功夫,是我一手调教出来的。我今天上午没空,要不,帮你这点忙,还不是一句话?”

  杜洛瓦一听,立刻露出为难的样子,犹豫半天,才怯生生地说道:

  “我在这个时候去找她,恐怕不太合适吧?……”

  “没关系,你尽管去好了。她已经起床,我下楼时,她已在我的书房里替我整理笔记。”

  杜洛瓦还是不敢上去。

  “不行……这哪儿行?”

  弗雷斯蒂埃两手搭在他的肩头,把他的身子使劲转了过去,一边往楼梯边推搡,一边向他说道:

  “我说你就去吧,你这个人怎么这样肉呢?我既然叫你去,总不会没有道理的。你难道一定要我再爬上四楼,领着你去见她,把你的情况向她讲一讲?”

  杜洛瓦这才打消顾虑:

  “那好,既然这样,我就只好从命了。我将对她说,是你一定要我上去找她的。”

  “行,你怎么说都行。放心好了,她不会吃掉你的。最主要的是,可别忘了今天下午三点的约会。”

  “请放心,我不会忘的。”

  这样,弗雷斯蒂埃心急火燎地赶紧走了,站在楼梯边的杜洛瓦于是开始慢慢地拾级而上,同时心中在考虑着应当怎样说明自己的来意,仍为自己不知会受到怎样的接待而有点忐忑不安。

  腰间系着蓝布围裙、手上拿着笤帚的仆人,来给他开了门。仆人未等他开口,先就说道:

  “先生出去了。”

  杜洛瓦不慌不忙地说道:

  “请去问一下弗雷斯蒂埃夫人,看她现在能不能见我。请告诉她,我刚才已在街上见到弗雷斯蒂埃先生,是他叫我来的。”

  仆人随即走了,杜洛瓦在门边等着。须臾,仆人回转来,打开右边一扇门,向他说道:

  “太太请先生进去。”

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人正坐有书房里的一把扶手椅上。书房不大,四壁严严实实地围着一圈高大的红木书架。一排排隔板上整齐地码放着各类图书。形形色色的精装本更是色彩纷呈,有红的、黄的、绿的、紫的和蓝的,使得本来单调乏味的小小书屋显得琳琅满目,充满勃勃生机。

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人穿了一件镶着花边的晨衣。她转过身来,嘴角漾着一丝笑意,把手伸给杜洛瓦,从宽大的敞口衣袖中,露出了她那洁白的手臂。

  “您怎么这么早就来了?”她向他问道。

  但接着又补充道:

  “我毫无责备的意思,只是随便问问。”

  杜洛瓦结结巴巴地说:

  “啊,夫人,我本不想上来,刚才在楼下见到您丈夫,是他一定要我来的。至于我为何而来,实在叫我难于启齿。”

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人指了指一把椅子:

  “请坐下说吧。”

  她把一支鹅毛笔在指间迅速转动着,面前摊着的一大张纸,刚刚写了一半,显然是因杜洛瓦的来访而中断了。

  她坐在办公桌前,从容不迫地处理着日常事务,好像在自己的房间里一样无拘无束。由于刚刚洗浴过,从她那披着晨衣的身上不断地散发出一缕缕令人神驰心醉的清新幽香。循着这股幽香,杜洛瓦不禁暗暗揣度起来,觉得这轻柔罗纱裹着的玉体,一定是不但青春焕发,白皙娇美,而且体态丰满,富于温馨。

  见杜洛瓦始终一声不吭,她只得又问道:

  “怎么样?有什么事您就照直说吧。”

  杜洛瓦欲言又止,支支吾吾地说道:

  “是这样的……我实在……不好意思……为了写瓦尔特先生要的那篇关于阿尔及利亚的文章……我昨晚回去后写得很晚才上床就寝……今天……一早起来又写……可是总觉得写得不像样子……我一气之下把写好的东西全都撕了……我对于这一行还有点不太习惯……所以今天来找弗雷斯蒂埃给我帮个忙……就这一次……”

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人哈哈大笑,从而打断了他那结结巴巴的话语。从这笑声中可以看出,她是那样地高兴、快乐,甚至有点洋洋自得。

  “这样他就让您来找我了……?”她接着说道,“这可真有意思……”

  “是的,夫人。他说您要是肯帮我这个忙,一定比他强得多……可是我不好意思,哪能为这点小事来麻烦您?情况就是这样。”

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人站起身,说道:

  “您的这个想法倒触发了我的兴趣,这种合作方式一定很有意思。好吧,那就请坐到我的位置上来,因为文章如果直接由我来写,报馆里的人一下就会认出笔迹。我们这就来把您那篇文章写出来,而且定要一炮打响。”

  杜洛瓦坐下来,在面前摊开一张纸,然后拿起笔等待着。

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人站在一边,看着他做这些准备工作。随后,她走到壁炉边拿起一支香烟,点着后说道:

  “您知道,我一干起活来就要抽烟。来,给我讲讲您打算写些什么?”

  杜洛瓦抬起头来,不解地看着她:

  “我也不知道。我来这儿找您就是为了这个。”

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人只得说道:

  “不错,文章可以由我来组织。但我不能做无米之炊,我所能做的是提供作料。”

  杜洛瓦依然满脸窘态,最后只得吞吞吐吐地说道:

  “我这篇散记,想从动身那天讲起。”

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人在桌子的另一头坐了下来,同他遥遥相对,一面仍目不转睛地看着他:

  “很好,那就从动身那天讲起来吧。请注意,就当我一个人在听您讲,可以讲得慢一点,不要遗漏任何东西。我将从中挑选所需的东西。”

  然而真的要讲起来,他又不知从何说起了。弗雷斯蒂埃夫人只好像教堂里听人忏悔的神甫那样不断地询问他,向他提出一些具体问题,帮助他回忆当时的详情和他所遇见的、那怕只有一面之缘的人士。

  就这样,弗雷斯蒂埃夫人逼着他讲了大约一刻钟,然后突然打断了他:

  “咱们现在可以开始写起来了。首先,我们将以您给一位朋友谈见闻的方式来写这篇文章。这样可以随便一些,想说什么就说什么,尽量把文章写得自然而有趣。好,就这样,开始吧:

  亲爱的亨利,你说过,想知道一些有关阿尔及利亚的情况,从今天起,我将满足你的这一要求。住在这种干打垒的小土屋中,我天天实在闲极了,因此将把我每一天,甚至每一小时的切身经历写成日记,然后便寄给你。然而这样一来,有些情况势必会未加斟酌便如实写出,因而显得相当粗糙,这我也就管不了许多了。你只要不把它拿出来给你身边的那些女士看,也就行了……

  口授到这里,她停了下来,把已熄灭的香烟重新点着。她一停,杜洛瓦手上那支鹅毛笔在稿纸上发出的沙沙声,也立即戛然而止。

  “咱们再往下写,”她随后说。

  阿尔及利亚是法国的属地,面积很大,周围是人迹罕至的广大地区,即我们常说的沙漠、撒哈拉、中非等等……

  阿尔及尔这座洁白美丽的城市,便是这奇异大陆的

  门户。

  要去那里,首先得坐船。这对我们大家来说,并不是人人都会顺利无虞的。你是知道的,我对于驯马很是在行,上校的那几匹烈马,就是由我驯服的。可是一个人无论怎样精通骑术,一到海上,要征服那汹涌的波涛,他也就无所施展了。我就是这样。

  你想必还记得我们把他叫做“吐根大夫”①的桑布勒塔军医吧。在我来此地之前,每当我们认为机会到来,想到军医所那个洞天福地去松快一天的时候,我们便找个理由,到那儿去找他看病。

  --------

  ①“吐根”,草药。其根茎呈暗黑色,可入药,有催吐作用。

  他总穿着一条红色长裤,叉开两条粗壮的大腿坐在

  椅子上,同时手扶膝盖,胳肘朝上,使臂膀弯成一个弓形,两只鼓鼓的眼珠转个不停,嘴里轻轻地咬着那发白的胡子。

  你还记得吗,那千篇一律的药方是这样写的:

  “该士兵肠胃失调,请照方发给本医师所配三号催吐剂一副,服后休息十二小时,即可痊愈。”

  此催吐剂是那样神圣,人人不得拒绝服用。现在大夫既然开了,当然是照服不误。再说服了“吐根大夫”配制的这种催吐剂,还可享受难得的十二小时休息。

  现在呢,亲爱的朋友,在前往非洲的途中,我们在四十小时中所经受的煎熬,形同服了另一种谁也无法逃脱的催吐剂,而这一回,这种虎狼之剂,却用的是大西洋轮船公司的配方。

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人搓搓手,显然对文章的构思感到非常满意。

  她又点燃一支烟,站起身在房间里来回踱着方步,一边抽着烟,一边继续口授。她把嘴努成一个小圆圈,烟从小圆圈喷出,先是袅袅上升,然后渐渐扩散开来,变成一条条灰白的线条,轻飘飘地在空中飘荡,看去酷似透明的薄雾,又像是蛛网般的水汽。面对这残留不去的轻柔烟霭,她时而张开手掌将其驱散,时而伸出食指,像锋利的刀刃一样,用力向下切去,然后聚精会神地看着那被切成两断、已经模糊难辨的烟缕慢慢地消失,直至无影无踪。

  杜洛瓦早已抬起头来,目不转睛地注视着她的一举一动,及她在这漫不经心的游戏中所显现的优雅身姿和面部表情。

  她此刻正在为铺陈途中插曲而冥思苦想,把她凭空臆造的几个旅伴勾划得活灵活现,并虚构了一段他与一位去非洲和丈夫团聚的陆军上尉的妻子,一见钟情的风流韵事。

  这之后,她坐下来,向杜洛瓦问了问有关阿尔及利亚的地形走向,因为她对此还一无所知。现在,经过寥寥数语,她对这方面的了解已同杜洛瓦相差无几了。接着,她用短短几笔,对这块殖民地的政治情况作了一番描绘,好让读者有个准备,将来能够明了作者在随后要发表的几篇文章中所提出的各个严峻问题。

  随后,她又施展其惊人的想象,凭空编造了一次奥兰省①之行,所涉及的主要是各种各样的女人,有摩尔女人、犹太女人和西班牙女人。

  --------

  ①奥兰省,在阿尔及利亚西部地区。

  “要想吸引读者,还得靠这些,”她说。

  文章最后写的是,乔治·杜洛瓦在赛伊达的短暂停留,说他这个下土在这高原脚下的小城中,同一位在艾因哈吉勒城造纸厂工作的西班牙女工萍水相逢,两人热烈地相恋着。故事虽然不长,但也曲折动人。比如他们常于夜间在寸草不生的乱石岗幽会,虽然四周怪石林立,豺狼、鬣狗和阿拉伯犬的嗥叫声此起彼伏,令人毛骨悚然,但他们却像是压根儿没有听到似的。

  这时,弗雷斯蒂埃夫人又口授了一句,语调中透出明显的欢欣:

  “欲知后事如何,且看明日本报。”

  接着,她站起身说道:

  “亲爱的杜洛瓦先生,现在您该知道了,天下的文章就是这样写出来的。请在上面签个名吧。”

  杜洛瓦犹豫不决,难于下笔。

  “您倒是签呀,这有什么可犹豫的!”

  他笑了笑,于是在搞纸下方匆匆写了几个字:

      “乔治·杜洛瓦。”

  她嘴上抽着烟,又开始在房间里踱来踱去。杜洛瓦的目光一直没有离开她,脑海中竟找不出一句话来表达他的感激之情。他为自己能这样近地同她呆在一起而感到无比的快乐。他们之间这种初次交往便如此亲近的接触,不仅使他分外感激,周身也洋溢着一种说不出的欢快。他感到,她身边的一切都成了她身体的一部分。房内的陈发,从桌椅到堆满图书的四壁,乃至弥漫着烟草味的空气,是那样地特别,那样地柔媚、甜蜜,令人陶醉,无不同她有着密不可分的关系。

  她突然向他问道:

  “您觉得我的朋友德·马莱尔夫人怎么样?”

  毫无准备的他不禁一愣,半晌答道:

  “我……我觉得……我觉得她非常迷人。”

  “是吗?”

  “当然。”

  他本想加一句:“但还比不上您。”然而终究未敢造次。

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人又说:

  “您对她还不太了解,她性格开朗,反应敏捷,可不是那种常见的女人。比如说,她这个人常会放荡不羁,完全无拘无束。因为这一点,她丈夫对她相当冷落。他只看到她的缺点,而看不到她的优点。”

  听说德·马莱尔夫人已经结婚,杜洛瓦不禁流露出惊讶的神色,然而这却是应在料想之中的。

  只听杜洛瓦问道:

  “是吗?……她结婚了?那么她丈夫是干什么的?”

  弗雷斯蒂埃夫人扬起眉毛,轻轻地耸了耸肩,面部充满令人难以捉摸的表情,说道:

  “他在诺尔省铁路部门任稽察,每个月来巴黎小住一星期。他妻子将这段时间对他的接待讥讽为‘强制性服务’,或是‘一周苦役’,再或是‘神圣的一周’。其实等您对她有了进一步的了解,您将会发现,她是一个非常乖巧而又随和的女人。因此这两天,您不妨找个时间去看看她。”

  杜洛瓦已经不想走了,他好像要一直呆下去,觉得他此刻是在自己家里。

  然而这时,客厅的门忽然轻轻打开,一位身材高大的男士未经通报便走了进来。

  看到房内有个男人,他停了下来。刹那间,弗雷斯蒂埃夫人似乎有点不知所措,从肩头到面庞出现一阵红晕。但她很快便恢复了常态,十分平静地说道:

  “进来呀,亲爱的。我来给你介绍一下,这位是乔治·杜洛瓦先生,查理的一位好友,未来的新闻记者。”

  接着,她又以另一种腔调向杜洛瓦说道:

  “他是我们亲密无间、最为要好的相知,德·沃德雷克伯爵。”

  两位男士,各自盯着对方看了一眼,并彬彬有礼地互相欠了欠身。见有客人到来,杜洛瓦立即退了出来。

  谁也没有挽留他。他喃喃地说了两句感谢的话语,握了握弗雷斯蒂埃夫人伸过来的手。新来的客人面容冷漠而又严肃,一副上流社会的绅士派头。杜洛瓦再度向他欠了欠身,带着神不守舍的慌乱心情,一径走了出来,好像自己刚才做了什么蠢事似的。

  到了街上,他依然是一副垂头丧气、闷闷不乐的样子,心头隐约笼罩着一种说不出所以然的哀愁。他漫无目的地往前走着,不明白自己为何会在突然间这样地无精打采。他想了想,但什么原因也未找到。不过德·沃德雷克伯爵的严肃面容总不断地浮现在他的眼前。伯爵虽然已显出一点老相,头发已经花白,但脸上依然是一副悠闲自在、傲视一切的神情,只有腰缠万贯、对自己信心十足的富有者才会这样。

  杜洛瓦忽然发现,他同弗雷斯蒂埃夫人的促膝而谈,是那样地自然,那样地无拘无束,不想这位不速之客的到来把它打断了,这就不能不使他像是被人浇了盆冷水似的,心中顿时产生一种丧魂落魄的失落感。类似的情况常会发生:人们只要听到一句不如意的话语,看见一件不遂心的事情,有时哪怕很不起眼,但却会立刻勾起深深的不快。

  此外,他似乎感到,这位伯爵一见到他在那里,脸上便露出了不悦之色。原因何在,他一直未弄明白。

  那篇要命的文章既已写好,到下午三时赴约之前,他已没有任何事情要做。而现在,才刚刚十二点。他摸了摸衣兜,身上还有六法郎五十生丁。他于是走进一家叫做“杜瓦尔”的大众化餐馆吃了餐便饭。然后在街上闲逛了一阵。到钟打三点,他终于登上了《法兰西生活报》的那个兼作广告的楼梯。

  几个杂役双臂抱在胸前,正坐在一条长凳上待命。同时在一张类似校用讲坛的小桌后面,一个负责传达工作的人,在忙着将刚收到的邮件一一归类。总之秩序井然,完美无缺,今来访者不由得肃然起敬。不但如此,他们个个举止庄重,敛声静气,那气宇轩昂、潇洒自如的仪表,完全是一副大报馆接待人员的派头。

  杜洛瓦于是走上前去,向传达问道:

  “请问瓦尔特先生在吗?”

  传达彬彬有礼地答道:

  “经理正在开会。您若想见他,请到那边稍坐片刻。”

  说着,他向杜洛瓦指了指里面已挤满了人的候见厅。

  坐在候见厅的客人,有的神态庄重,胸前挂着勋章,一副自命不凡的样子;有的则不修边幅,连里面的衬衣领也未翻出来,身上那套扣子一直系到脖颈的大礼服,更是污渍斑斑,酷似地图上边缘参差不齐的陆地和海洋,来客中还夹杂着三位女士。其中一位容貌姣好,楚楚动人,且通身浓妆艳抹,同妓女一般。另一位就坐在她的身旁,只是容颜憔悴,满脸皱纹,但也认真打扮了一番,很像那些昔日普在舞台上一展风采的女演员,到了人老珠黄之际,常常仍要不惜一切地把自己打扮成百媚千娇的少女,但一眼便会被人识破行藏,到头来,不过是矫揉造作,空劳无益而已。

  那第三个女人,则通身缟素,默默地枯坐在角落里,样子像个命途多舛的寡妇。杜洛瓦心想,这个女人一定是来祈求周济的。

  这当儿,二十多分钟已经过去,可是仍没有一人被传唤进去。

  杜洛瓦于是想了个主意,只见他返身回到入口处,向那位传达说道:

  “是瓦尔特先生约我下午三点来这里见他的。既然他此刻没空,不知弗雷斯蒂埃先生在不在,他是我的朋友,我希望能见他一见。”

  传达于是领着他,走过一条长长的过道,来到一间大厅里。四位男士,正围坐在一张又宽又长、漆成绿色的桌子旁伏案忙碌。

  弗雷斯蒂埃嘴上叼着香烟,正在壁炉前玩接木球游戏①。由于手脚灵巧,他玩这种游戏真是得心应手,每次都能用木棒尖端把抛向空中的黄杨木大木球稳稳接住。

  --------

  ①此游戏为一种个人玩的游戏。木球由一根细绳连在一端削尖的木棒上。球上有孔,玩的人把球抛向空中,待球落下时,用棒尖戳进球孔,把球接住。

  他一面玩,一面还在那里数着:

  “二十二、二十三、二十四、二十五。”

  杜洛瓦接着他数的数,帮他喊了一声:

  “二十六!”

  弗雷斯蒂埃向他抬了抬眼皮,但仍在一下一下地挥动他的手臂:

  “啊,你来啦!……我昨天一连气玩了五十七下。要说玩这玩艺儿,这里只有圣波坦比我强。见着经理了吗?老家伙诺贝尔要是玩起这木球来,那样子才叫滑稽哩。他总张着大嘴,好像要把球吞到肚里去。”

  一个正在伏案看稿的编辑,这时转过头来,向他说道:“喂,弗雷斯蒂埃,我知道有个球现正等待买主,球是用安的列斯群岛上等木料做的,东西甭提多好。据说此球是从宫里弄出来的,西班牙王后曾经玩过。人家开价六十法郎,倒也不算太贵。”

  弗雷斯蒂埃问道:

  “东西现在在哪儿?”

  然而恰在这时,到第三十七下,他未把球接住,于是就势收场,打开一个木柜,把球放回原处。杜洛瓦看见柜内放着二十来个做工精湛的木球,而且一个个都编了号,像是价值连城的古玩一样。

  关上柜门后,弗雷斯蒂埃又问道:

  “我说那球此刻在哪儿?”

  那位编辑答道:

  “在滑稽歌剧院一售票员手里。你若感兴趣,我明天带来给你看看。”

  “好的,一言为定。要是东西真好,我便把它买下。这玩艺儿,总是多多益善。”

  交待完毕,他转向杜洛瓦说道:

  “请随我来,我这就带你去见经理。否则你要等到晚上七点钟,才能见到他。”

  穿过候见厅时,杜洛瓦看到刚才那些人,还在原来的位置上坐着。一见弗雷斯蒂埃到来,那个年轻女人和另一位很像当过演员的老女人立即站起身,向他迎了上来。

  弗雷斯蒂埃随即把她们俩领到窗边去了。他们的谈话虽然有意压得很低,杜洛瓦仍听到弗雷斯蒂埃对她们以“你”相称,关系显然非同一般。

  随后,走过两道包着软垫的门,他们终于到了经理的房间里。

  一个多小时以来,经理哪里是在开会,原来是在同几位戴着平顶帽的男士玩纸牌。还有两人,杜洛瓦头天晚上已在弗雷斯蒂埃家见过。

  瓦尔特先生手上拿着牌,正聚精会神地玩着,动作十分老练。对方显然也是一名赌场老手,一把花花绿绿的薄纸片在他手上,或是打出去,或是拿起来,再或是轻轻摆弄,是那样地灵巧、熟练,得心应手。诺贝尔·德·瓦伦坐在经理的椅子上,在赶写一篇文章,雅克·里瓦尔则嘴上叼着雪茄,躺在一张长沙发上闭目养神。

  房间里因久不通风而空气浑浊,并掺杂着房内陈设的皮革味,存放多日的烟草味和印刷品散发的油墨味。此外,还弥漫着一种编辑部所独有的气味,每个报馆同仁都深为熟悉。

  镶嵌着铜质装饰的红木桌上,杂乱无章地放的全是纸张,有信件、明信片、报纸、杂志、供货商发货票以及各种各样的印刷品。

  弗雷斯蒂埃同站在玩牌人身后的几位看客握了握手,然后一声未吭,站在那里观看牌局。待瓦尔特老头赢了后,才上前一步,向他说道:

  “我的朋友杜洛瓦来了。”

  老头的目光从镜片的上方投过来,向年轻人端详良久,随后问道:

  “我要的那篇文章带来了吗?围绕莫雷尔质询的辩论已经开始,这篇文章若能与有关发言同时见报,效果一定不错。”

  杜洛瓦立即从衣袋里抽出几张折成四叠的纸片:

  “带来了,先生。”

  经理满脸喜悦,微笑道:

  “太好了,太好了。您果然言而有信。弗雷斯蒂埃,是不是劳你的驾,帮我看一看?”

  弗雷斯蒂埃急忙答道:

  “我看这就不必了,瓦尔特先生。为了帮他熟习我们这一行,这篇文章是我同他一起写的,写得很好。”

  现在是一位身材瘦长的先生,即一位中左议员发牌,经理一边接过牌,一边漫不经心地又说了一句:

  “既然如此,那就听你的。”

  趁新的一局尚未开始,弗雷斯蒂埃随即俯下身来,凑近他耳边低声说道:

  “顺便提醒您一下,您答应过我,让杜洛瓦来接替马朗波。

  您看我可否现在就把他留下,待遇相同?”

  “可以,就这样。”

  经理话音刚落,弗雷斯蒂埃拉着杜洛瓦,拔腿就把他带了出来,瓦尔特先生则带着他那浓厚的赌兴,又玩了起来。

  他们离开房间时,诺贝尔·德·瓦伦眼皮抬也没抬,对于杜洛瓦的出现,似乎压根儿未加留意,或没有将他认出来。雅克·里瓦尔则不同,他拉起杜洛瓦的手,带着分外的热情使劲握了握,一副古道热肠、助人为乐的神情。

  在往外走的路上,他们又到了候见厅里。众人一见他们到来,都抬起了头。弗雷斯蒂埃立刻向那年轻的女人打了个招呼,声音特别响亮,显然是要让所有在此等候的人都能听见:

  “经理一会儿就见您。他此刻正在同预算委员会的两个人商量事情。”

  说着,他疾步往外走去,满脸身居要职、忙碌不堪的样子,似乎马上要去赶写一份十万火急的电讯稿。

  一回到刚才那个编辑室,弗雷斯蒂埃径直走到木柜前,拿出他心爱的木球又玩了起来,并一面数着数,一面每抛出一球,便乘机向杜洛瓦交待两句:

  “就这样吧。以后你每天下午三点来这儿找我,我会告诉你该跑哪些地方,采访哪些人,是当时就去,还是晚上去,再或是第二天早上去……一。……首先,我将给你开一封介绍信,去拜访一下警察局一处处长……二。……他会指定一位下属同你联系。对于该处所提供的重要新闻,当然是可以公开或基本上可以公开的……三。……将由你同这个下属商量有关采访事宜。具体事项,你可问圣波坦,他对这方面的情况了如指掌……四。……你一会儿或明天去见他一下。特别需要注意的是,你应学会应付各种各样的局面,想方设法从我派你去采访的那些人口中,得到自己所需要的东西……五。……任何地方,不管门禁多么森严,最终都要能进得去……六。……你干这项工作,每月固定薪俸是二百法郎,如果你独辟蹊径,利用采访所得,写一些有趣的花絮,则文章见报后以每行两个苏计酬……七。……如果文章是有人按既定的题目约你写的,则每行也以两个苏计酬……八。”

  说完,他的注意力便全集中到手上的木球上去了,只见他继续不慌不忙地数着:

  “……九。……十。……十一。……十二。……十三。”

  到第十四下,他没有接着,不禁骂了起来:

  “又是他妈的十三!我总过不了这个坎儿。看来我将来定会死在同十三有关的数字上。”

  一个编辑忙完了手头的活,也到柜子里拿个木球玩了起来。他身材矮小,看去简直像个孩子,其实他已经三十五岁了。这时又走进几位记者,他们一进来,便纷纷到柜内寻找自己的球。所以现在是六个人,肩并肩,背对着墙,周而复始地以同样的动作,把球一次次抛向空中。这些球因木质而异,有红的,黄的和黑的。大家你追我赶,看谁接得多,两个还在埋头工作的编辑这时站了起来,替他们作裁判。

  结果弗雷斯蒂埃得了十一分,而那个一脸孩子气的矮个儿男子则输了。他走去按了一下铃,向连忙赶来的听差吩咐道:

  “去拿九杯啤酒来。”

  在等候饮料的当儿,大家又玩了起来。

  杜洛瓦因而同他的这些新同事一起,喝了一杯啤酒。随后,他向弗雷斯蒂埃问道:

  “有我能做的事吗?”

  弗雷斯蒂埃答道:

  “今天没你的事了,你要想走,可以走了。”

  “那……我们那篇……稿子……,是否今天晚上就付印?”

  “是的。不过,这件事你就不用管了。排出的校样,由我来看。你现在要做的事情是,继续下去,把明天要用的稿子写出来。明天下午三点你把稿子带来,像今天一样。”

  杜洛瓦于是和所有在场的人握了握手,虽然他连他们的姓名还一无所知。然后他带着轻松愉快的心情,沿着那个漂亮的楼梯走了下去。

推荐阅读: